Four Basic Things You Should Know About Storing Wine

Some people collect things such as bags, jewelries, shoes, antique furniture, lamps, etc., however, there are also those that collect wine. The older the wine, the more expensive it costs, and the more precious it becomes. Because wine is affected by how you store it, you need to know the proper way of storing wine.

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Cool But Not Too Cool

It is okay to keep the wine in your refrigerator when you have plans to drink it within two months. However, for long storage, keeping them in your refrigerator is a big no-no. The low temperature can easily dry out the cork, allowing air to seep through the pores and ultimately affecting the wine.

Other big no-no’s for wine storage is keeping them inside a cabinet that receives direct sunlight or keeping them inside a room that’s always warm or hot. The high temperature could easily make the wine warmer, cooking it and affecting its taste and aroma.

The ideal temperature for storing wine is at about 45 degrees Fahrenheit to 65 degrees Fahrenheit, but if you want the perfect temperature, then keep them somewhere cool where the temperature is almost always steady at 55 degrees Fahrenheit.

Store Them in a Dark Room

The main reason why most wine bottles are colored is because the colored glass, more or less, acts like a sunglass that protects the liquid from the harsh UV rays of the sun. As you know, sunlight, especially the UV rays, not only speeds up the aging process of wine, but also cooks it up. In the long run, wines exposed to direct sunlight or kept in sunlit rooms age and degrade faster than those kept in dark rooms.

If you want to maintain the aroma and flavors of your wine, store them in a dark, cool place that does not receive any sunlight. If you are going to use bulbs inside your wine storage area, then use incandescent bulbs. Incandescent bulbs, like fluorescent bulbs, also emit a very small amount of UV rays, but unlike conventional bulbs, it does not cause fading to the wine labels.

Store Them Horizontally

The traditional way of storing wines is storing them horizontally. The horizontal wine racks not only help you save space, but it also keeps the liquid in contact with the cork. As mentioned earlier, corks can dry out. Its drying out can be caused by a lot of things – high humidity, for example, as well as too cold temperature or constant exposure to direct sunlight. With the cork always wet, air will not seep through and do damage to its flavors and aroma.

Proper Storage Areas

If you have a small wine collection, the best place to store them in is your basement where the temperature is low and no direct sunlight. Just make sure that the humidity in the basement is not too high that it can cause damage to your collection.

However, if you have a large collection and there is no space in your house, then you can simply rent a storage unit. There are climate-controlled storage units, so you can easily set the ideal temperature. Also, the storage units are safe and secure, so you need not worry about burglary. Just make sure though that you store them the right way so vibrations, even subtle ones, will not affect the sediments that have settled on the bottom.

 

About The Author

Jennifer Dalton is a freelance content writer for wine blogs. If you have a large collection of wines and you want a safe and secure place for them, she recommends renting a storage unit such as those offered by SYS Storage (http://sysstorage NULL.com/location NULL.shtml).

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